Child Nutrition Information

Child Nutrition Lessons

Lesson 1 - Fruit Group

What foods are in the Fruit Group?

  • Any fruit or 100% fruit juice counts as part of the Fruit Group. Fruits may be fresh, canned, frozen, or dried, and may be whole, cut-up, or pureed.

How much fruit is needed daily?

  • The amount of fruit you need to eat depends on age, sex, and level of physical activity. The amount each person needs can vary between 1 and 2 cups each day. Those who are very physically active may need more. Recommended daily amounts are shown in the table below.

What counts as a cup of fruit?

  • In general, 1 cup of fruit or 100% fruit juice, or ½ cup of dried fruit can be considered as 1 cup from the Fruit Group. The table below shows specific amounts that count as 1 cup of fruit (in some cases equivalents for ½ cup are also shown) towards your daily recommended intake.

Why is it important to eat fruit?

  • Eating fruit provides health benefits — people who eat more fruits and vegetables as part of an overall healthy diet are likely to have a reduced risk of some chronic diseases. Fruits provide nutrients vital for health and maintenance of your body.

Health Benefits

  • As part of an overall healthy diet, eating foods such as fruits that are lower in calories per cup instead of some other higher-calorie food may be useful in helping to lower calorie intake.
  • Eating a diet rich in vegetables and fruits as part of an overall healthy diet may reduce risk for heart disease, including heart attack and stroke.
  • Eating a diet rich in some vegetables and fruits as part of an overall healthy diet may protect against certain types of cancers.
  • Adding fruit can help increase intake of fiber and potassium which are important nutrients that many Americans do not get enough of in their diet.

For More Information on Fruits: Click Here

Lesson 1 - Fruit Group

What foods are in the Fruit Group?

  • Any fruit or 100% fruit juice counts as part of the Fruit Group. Fruits may be fresh, canned, frozen, or dried, and may be whole, cut-up, or pureed.

How much fruit is needed daily?

  • The amount of fruit you need to eat depends on age, sex, and level of physical activity. The amount each person needs can vary between 1 and 2 cups each day. Those who are very physically active may need more.

What counts as a cup of fruit?

  • In general, 1 cup of fruit or 100% fruit juice, or ½ cup of dried fruit can be considered as 1 cup from the Fruit Group.

Why is it important to eat fruit?

  • Eating fruit provides health benefits — people who eat more fruits and vegetables as part of an overall healthy diet are likely to have a reduced risk of some chronic diseases. Fruits provide nutrients vital for health and maintenance of your body.

Health Benefits

  • As part of an overall healthy diet, eating foods such as fruits that are lower in calories per cup instead of some other higher-calorie food may be useful in helping to lower calorie intake.
  • Eating a diet rich in vegetables and fruits as part of an overall healthy diet may reduce risk for heart disease, including heart attack and stroke.
  • Eating a diet rich in some vegetables and fruits as part of an overall healthy diet may protect against certain types of cancers.
  • Adding fruit can help increase intake of fiber and potassium which are important nutrients that many Americans do not get enough of in their diet.

For More Information on Fruits: Click Here

Lesson 2 - Vegetables Group

What foods are in the Vegetable Group?

  • Any vegetable or 100% vegetable juice counts as a member of the Vegetable Group. Vegetables may be raw or cooked; fresh, frozen, canned, or dried/dehydrated; and may be whole, cut-up, or mashed.
  • Based on their nutrient content, vegetables are organized into 5 subgroups: dark green; red and orange; beans, peas, and lentils; starchy; and other vegetables.

How many vegetables are needed?

  • The amount of vegetables you need to eat depends on your age, sex, and level of physical activity. The amount each person needs can vary between 1 and 3 cups each day. Those who are very physically active may need more.

What counts as a cup of vegetables?

  • In general, 1 cup of raw or cooked vegetables or vegetable juice, or 2 cups of raw leafy greens can be considered as 1 cup from the Vegetable Group.

Why is it important to eat vegetables?

  • Eating vegetables provides health benefits — people who eat more vegetables and fruits as part of an overall healthy diet are likely to have a reduced risk of some chronic diseases. Vegetables provide nutrients vital for health and maintenance of your body.

Health Benefits

All food and beverage choices matter – focus on variety, amount, and nutrition.

  • As part of an overall healthy diet, eating foods such as vegetables that are lower in calories per cup instead of some other higher-calorie food may be useful in helping to lower calorie intake.
  • Eating a diet rich in vegetables and fruits as part of an overall healthy diet may reduce risk for heart disease, including heart attack and stroke.
  • Eating a diet rich in some vegetables and fruits as part of an overall healthy diet may protect against certain types of cancers.
  • Adding vegetables can help increase intake of fiber and potassium, which are important nutrients that many Americans do not get enough of in their diet.

For More Information on Fruits: Click Here

Lesson 3 - Grain Group

What foods are in the Grains Group?

  • Any food made from wheat, rice, oats, cornmeal, barley, or another cereal grain is a grain product. Bread, pasta, breakfast cereals, grits, and tortillas are examples of grain products. Foods such as popcorn, rice, and oatmeal are also included in the Grains Group. 

  • Grains are divided into 2 subgroups: Whole Grains and Refined Grains. Whole grains contain the entire grain kernel ― the bran, germ, and endosperm. Examples of whole grains include whole-wheat flour, bulgur (cracked wheat), oatmeal, whole cornmeal, and brown rice. Refined grains have been milled, a process that removes the bran and germ. This is done to give grains a finer texture and improve their shelf life, but it also removes dietary fiber, iron, and many B vitamins. Some examples of refined grain products are white flour, de-germed cornmeal, white bread, and white rice. 

  • Most refined grains are enriched. This means certain B vitamins (thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, folic acid) and iron are added back after processing. Fiber is not added back to enriched grains. Check the ingredient list on refined grain products to make sure that the word “enriched” is included in the grain name. Some food products are made from mixtures of whole grains and refined grains.

How many grain foods are needed daily?

  • The amount of grain foods you need to eat depends on your age, sex, and level of physical activity. The amount each person needs can vary between 3 and 8 ounce-equivalents each day — at least half of the grains you eat should be whole grains. Those who are very physically active may need more. Recommended daily amounts are listed in the table below. Most Americans consume enough grains, but few are whole grains.

What counts as an ounce-equivalent (oz-equiv) of grains?

  • In general, 1 slice of bread, 1 cup of ready-to-eat cereal, or ½ cup of cooked rice, cooked pasta, or cooked cereal can be considered as 1 ounce-equivalent from the Grains Group. The table below lists specific amounts that count as 1 ounce-equivalent of grains towards your daily recommended intake. In some cases the number of ounce-equivalents for common portions are also shown.

Why is it important to eat grains, especially whole grains?

  • Eating grains, especially whole grains, provides health benefits. People who eat whole grains as part of a healthy diet have a reduced risk of some chronic diseases. Grains provide many nutrients that are vital for the health and maintenance of our bodies.

Health Benefits

  • Consuming whole grains as part of a healthy diet may reduce the risk of heart disease.

  • Consuming whole grain foods that contain fiber, as part of an overall healthy diet, can support healthy digestion.

  • Eating whole grains, as part of an overall healthy diet, may help with weight management.

  • Eating grain products fortified with folate helps prevent neural tube defects when consumed as part of an overall healthy diet before and during pregnancy.

For More Information on Grains: Click Here

Lesson 4 - Protein Group

What foods are in the Protein Foods Group?

  • All foods made from seafood; meat, poultry, and eggs; beans, peas, and lentils; and nuts, seeds, and soy products are considered part of the Protein Foods Group.
  • Select a variety of protein foods to improve nutrient intake and health benefits, including at least 8 ounces of cooked seafood per week. Young children need less, depending on their age and calorie needs. The advice to consume seafood does not apply to vegetarians. Vegetarian options in the Protein Foods Group include beans, peas, and lentils, processed soy products, and nuts and seeds. Meat and poultry choices should be lean or low-fat.

How much food from the Protein Foods Group is needed daily?

  • The amount of protein foods you need to eat depends on age, sex, and level of physical activity. The amount each person needs can vary between 2 and 6½ ounce-equivalents each day. Those who are very physically active may need more. Most Americans eat enough food from this group, but need to make leaner and more varied selections of these foods. Recommended daily amounts are shown in the table below.

What counts as an ounce-equivalent in the Protein Foods Group?

  • In general, 1 ounce of meat, poultry or fish, ¼ cup cooked beans, 1 egg, 1 tablespoon of peanut butter, or ½ ounce of nuts or seeds can be considered as 1 ounce-equivalent from the Protein Foods Group. The table below lists specific amounts that count as 1 ounce-equivalent in the Protein Foods Group towards your daily recommended intake.

Why is it important to make lean or low-fat choices from the Protein Foods Group?

  • Foods in the meat, poultry, fish, eggs, nuts, and seed group provide nutrients that are vital for health and maintenance of your body. However, choosing foods from this group that are high in saturated fat and cholesterol may have health implications.

Health Benefits

  • Proteins function as building blocks for bones, muscles, cartilage, skin, and blood. They are also building blocks for enzymes, hormones, and vitamins. Proteins are one of three nutrients that provide calories (the others are fat and carbohydrates).
  • Nutrients provided by various protein foods can differ. Varying your protein food choices can provide your body with a range of nutrients designed to keep your body functioning well. B vitamins help build tissue and aid in forming red blood cells. Iron can prevent anemia. Magnesium helps build bones and supports muscle function. Zinc can support your immune systems.
  • EPA and DHA are omega-3 fatty acids found in varying amounts in seafood. Eating 8 ounces per week of seafood may help reduce the risk for heart disease.

     

For More Information on Proteins: Click Here

Lesson 5 - Dairy Group

What foods are included in the Dairy Group?

  • The Dairy Group includes milk, yogurt, cheese, lactose-free milk and fortified soy milk and yogurt. It does not include foods made from milk that have little calcium and a high fat content, such as cream cheese, sour cream, cream, and butter.

How much food from the Dairy Group is needed daily?

  • About 90% of Americans do not get enough dairy, therefore most individuals would benefit by increasing intake of fat-free or low-fat dairy, whether from milk (including lactose-free milk), yogurt, and cheese, or from fortified soy milk or yogurt. The amount of dairy foods you need each day depends on your age and can vary between 1 ½ to 2 cups for toddlers, 2 ½ cups for children under 10 and 3 cups for older children through adults. Recommended daily amounts are shown in the table below.

What counts as a cup in the Dairy Group?

  • In general, 1 cup of milk, yogurt, or soy milk, or 1 ½ ounces of natural cheese can be considered as 1 cup from the Dairy Group. The table below lists specific amounts that count as 1 cup in the Dairy Group towards your daily recommended intake.

Why is it important to eat/drink dairy?

  • Consuming dairy products provides health benefits — especially building and maintaining strong bones. Foods in the Dairy Group provide nutrients that are vital for health and maintenance of your body. These nutrients include calcium, potassium, vitamin D, and protein.

Health Benefits

  • Calcium and vitamin D are important nutrients at any age. Intake of dairy products that contain these nutrients help to:

  • Improve bone health especially in children and adolescents, when bone mass is being built.

  • Promote bone health and prevent the onset of osteoporosis in adults, most of whom do not do not get enough of these nutrients.

For More Information on Dairy: Click Here

Lesson 6 - Limiting Certain Foods

Use Oils

  • Oils are fats that are liquid at room temperature, like vegetable oils used in cooking. They come from many different plants and from fish. Oils are not a food group, but they provide you with important nutrients such as unsaturated fats and vitamin E. Choosing unsaturated fat in place of saturated fat can reduce your risk of heart disease and improve “good” (HDL) cholesterol levels.
  • A number of foods are natural sources of oils, like nuts, olives, some fish, and avocados. Most oils are high in monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fats, and low in saturated fats. Foods that are mainly made of oil include mayonnaise, certain salad dressings, and soft (tub or squeeze) margarine.
  • The fat in some tropical plants, including coconut oil, palm oil, and palm kernel oil, are not included in the oils category because they are higher in saturated fats than other oils. For nutritional purposes they should be considered to be solid fats (see Limit Saturated Fat below). Solid fats are fats that are solid at room temperature, like butter, lard and shortening. Solid fats come from many animal foods and can be made from vegetable oils through a process called hydrogenation.

Limit Added Sugars

  • To build healthy eating habits and stay within calorie needs, individuals over age 2 should choose foods and beverages with little to no added sugars and those under age 2 should avoid them altogether. Added sugars are sugars and syrups that are added to foods or beverages when they are processed or prepared. This does not include sugars found in milk and fruits.

Foods Containing Added Sugars

  • beverages, such as regular soft drinks, energy or sports drinks, fruit drinks, sweetened coffee and tea
  • breakfast cereals and bars
  • cakes
  • candy
  • cookies and brownies
  • ice cream and dairy desserts
  • pies and cobblers
  • sugars, jams, syrups, and sweet toppings
  • sweet rolls, pastries, and donuts

Limit Saturated Fat

  • Saturated fat is often found in forms that are solid at room temperature – examples include milk fat, butter, or the fat inside or around meat. A few food products such as coconut oil, palm oils, or whole milk remain as liquids at room temperature but are high in saturated fat.
  • Cut back on saturated fat by replacing foods high in saturated fat (such as butter, whole milk, cheese, and baked goods) with foods higher in unsaturated fat (found in plants and fish, such as vegetable oils, peanuts, avocado, and salmon)

Foods containing Saturated Fat:

  • Desserts and baked goods, such as cakes, cookies, donuts, pastries, and croissants
  • Many cheeses and foods containing cheese, such as pizza, burgers and sandwiches
  • Sausages, hot dogs, bacon, and ribs
  • Fried potatoes (French fries) – if fried in a saturated fat or hydrogenated oil
  • Regular ground beef (85% lean) and cuts of meat with visible fat
  • Fried chicken and other chicken dishes with the skin
  • Whole milk and full-fat dairy foods and dairy desserts

Limit Sodium

  • For most people ages 14 years and older, sodium should not exceed 2,300 mg per day. Consuming less than this level is recommended for children younger than 13 years old.
  • The relationship between sodium intake and blood pressure is well-documented. As one goes up, so does the other. Evidence has shown that limiting sodium intake provides benefits and may reduce one’s risk for heart disease and hypertension.

Sodium is found in many of the foods we commonly eat and most of us get more than we need. Adding salt to food is a source of sodium, but it is often not the main reason for high sodium intake. Sodium is already added to a lot of the foods we buy and dishes we order. You can lower the amount of sodium you eat and drink with these tips:

  • Use the Nutrition Facts label to compare the sodium in packaged foods and beverages. Choose products with less sodium.
  • Buy low-sodium, reduced sodium, or no-salt-added products.
  • Look for fresh, frozen, or canned vegetables without added sauces or seasonings.
  • Choose fresh or frozen poultry, seafood, and lean meats instead of prepared or ready-to-eat products so that you can control the amount of salt you add yourself.
  • Cook more often at home to control the sodium in your food.
  • Add herbs and spices instead of salt to recipes and dishes.

For More Information on Limiting Bad Foods: Click Here

Lesson 7 - A Yummy Curriculum

This yummy curriculum introduces the importance of eating from all five food groups using the a variety of hands–on activities. Students also learn the importance of physical activity to staying healthy.

Training Lessons:

Fun Songs to Sing:

Foods in the Five Food Groups:

Information for Parents to help with Child Nutrition:

For More Information on MyPlate: Click Here

Lesson 8 - Top Tips for a Great Plate

Making food choices for a healthy lifestyle can be as simple as using these tips. Use the ideas in this list to balance your calories, to choose foods to eat more often, and to cut back on foods to eat less often.

Balance Calories

  • Find out how many calories YOU need for a day as a first step in managing your weight. Being physically active also helps you balance calories.

Enjoy your Food, but Eat Less

  • Take the time to fully enjoy your food as you eat it. Eating too fast or when your attention is elsewhere may lead to eating too many calories. Pay attention to hunger and fullness cues before, during, and after meals. Use them to recognize when to eat and when you’ve had enough.

Avoid Oversized Portions

  • Use a smaller plate, bowl, and glass. Portion out foods before you eat. When eating out, choose a smaller size option, share a dish, or take home part of your meal.

Foods to Eat More Often

  • Eat more vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and fat-free or 1% milk and dairy products. These foods have the nutrients you need for health—including potassium, calcium, vitamin D, and fiber. Make them the
    basis for meals and snacks.

Make Half your Plate Fruits and Vegetables

  • Choose red, orange, and dark-green vegetables like tomatoes, sweet potatoes, and broccoli, along with other vegetables for your meals. Add fruit to meals as part of main or side dishes or as dessert.

Switch to Fat-Free or Low-Fat (1%) Milk

  • They have the same amount of calcium and other essential nutrients as whole milk, but fewer calories and less saturated fat.

Lesson 9 - Tips to Include Fruit in your Day

Explore the world of fruit – fresh, canned, frozen, or dried. Use these tips to include fruit in your day.

Include Fruit at Breakfast

  • Top cereal with your favorite seasonal fruit, add bananas or chopped apples to pancakes, or mix raisins into hot oatmeal.

Take Fruit on the Go

  • Fruits like oranges, bananas, and apples are great portable snacks. You can also bring along a can of mandarin oranges or pineapple chunks packed in water.

Make your own Trail Mix

  • Combine one or two favorite breakfast cereals with dried cranberries and raisins. Bring for a snack in a small sealable bag or container.

Enjoy Fruit as a Snack

  • Make fruit kabobs using melon chunks, bananas, and grapes. Top with a light yogurt sauce for a fruity snack or side dish.

Add Fruit at Dinner

  • Chop up a combination of tropical or seasonal fruits to make a fruit salsa to top fish or chicken, or add fruit like grapefruit sections, apple wedges, or grapes to a tossed salad.

Keep Fruit on Hand

Cut up fruit and place in a bowl in the refrigerator. Put the bowl at the front of the shelf so that it’s the first thing you see when you open the door.

 

For More Information: Click Here

Lesson 10 - Healthy Snacks

Nutritious snacks help satisfy hunger in between meals and can help add variety to your daily food intake. Use these tips to make every bite count.

Build Your Own

  • Make your own snack mix with unsalted nuts and add-ins such as seeds, unsweetened cereal, raisins or other dried fruit, and plain popcorn.

Prep Ahead

  • Wash and cut up fresh vegetables and portion them into reusable containers so they’re ready to grab-and-go. Many veggies can be prepped like this.

Make it a Combo

  • Combine food groups to build satisfying snacks: yogurt and berries, apple with nut butter, or whole-grain crackers with turkey and avocado. Be creative!

Choose Vibrant Vegetables

  • Colorful and crunchy raw vegetables are a healthy choice. Try dipping broccoli, zucchini sticks, or baby carrots in hummus, guacamole, or a low-fat yogurt sauce.

Wash and Enjoy

  • Fresh fruit makes a great go-to snack when you are looking for a quick sweet treat. Apples, pears, grapes, and fresh berries are always easy and fast.

Keep Healthy Options Handy

  • Keep nutritious snack options, such as fruits and vegetables, visible and within reach in the fridge or on the counter for a convenient anytime snack.

For More Information: Click Herehttps://www.myplate.gov/tip-sheet/healthy-snacking-myplate

Lesson 11 - Healthy Eating for Kids

Empower kids to build healthy habits now and into the future. Use these tips to make every bite count!

Offer Variety

  • Include choices from each food group – fruits, vegetables, grains, protein foods, and dairy and fortified soy alternatives – in meals and snacks during each day.

Connect at Mealtime

  • Eat meals together whenever possible. Turn off the TV and put away phones and tablets, so you can “unplug” so you can focus on healthy foods and each other.

Make Good Nutrition Easy

  • Designate a shelf or a drawer in your fridge for your kids. Stock it with cut up fruits and vegetables, yogurt, nut butters, and whole-wheat mini bagels and crackers.

Think about Their Drinks

  • Make water and low-fat or fat-free dairy milk and fortified soy alternatives easy options to grab in your home. Have ready-to-go containers filled and in the fridge to take on outings.

Get Kids Involved

  • Depending on their age, kids can peel fruits, assemble salads, measure, scoop, and slice. Let them create and name their own side dish.

Have a Shopping Buddy

  • Let kids participate in grocery shopping online or in the store. Reward them by letting them choose their favorite fruit or maybe a new one.

For More Information: Click Here

Lesson 12 - Make Better Beverage Choices

What you drink is as important as what you eat. Many beverages contain added sugars and offer little or no nutrients. Use these tips to help you make better beverage choices.

Drink Water

  • Drink water instead of sugar-sweetened beverages. Regular soda, energy or sports drinks, and other sweetened drinks usually contain a lot of added sugars.

Encourage Kid-Friendly Drinks

  • Make water, low-fat or fat-free dairy milk, or unsweetened seltzer the go-to options for your kids. Serve 100% juice only on occasion.

Compare Food Labels

  • Use the Nutrition Facts label when shopping for beverages. Check and compare calories, amounts of added sugars, and servings per container.

Cut Coffee Calories

  • Skip the whipped cream and chocolate or caramel drizzle. Go with low-fat milk and a sprinkle of cinnamon or nutmeg for a lower calorie coffee.

Grab a Bottle and Go

  • Carry a clean, reusable water bottle in your bag to fill up throughout the day. Tap water is easy to find.

Jazz Up Your Drink

  • Perk up your plain water or seltzer water with lemon, lime, or orange slices. Maybe even try some fresh mint leaves or a few fresh or frozen berries.

For More Information: Click Here

Lesson 13 - Healthy Food Preparation

You can help your health by preparing your food with less added sugars, saturated fat, and sodium (salt).

Think Balance

  • Include a variety of delicious foods from all five food groups – fruits, vegetables, grains, protein foods, and dairy and fortified soy alternatives – when making meals.

Chop Fresh Produce in Advance

  • Cut up fresh fruits like melons and pineapples, and veggies like carrots and broccoli, when you have a few minutes. Store them in the fridge for meals and snacks.

Bake, Grill, Broil, or Roast

  • Limit frying – especially deep frying – to reduce unhealthy saturated fat and calories in the dishes you make. Most recipes can be adapted for healthier cooking methods.

Sweeten Foods with Fruit

  • Mix fruit into plain yogurt, cooked oatmeal, and smoothies to sweeten without adding sugar. Or, use that plain yogurt, uncooked oats, and fruit for some overnight oats.

Find more Flavor

  • Add a squeeze of lemon or lime juice to cooked vegetables and meat, chicken, or fish. Experiment with low-salt herbs and spices.

Read Food Labels

  • Use the Nutrition Facts Label to find out how much added sugars, saturated fat, and sodium (salt) are in the packaged foods you eat. Adjust your cooking methods and other ingredients accordingly.

For More Information: Click Here

Lesson 14 - Eating Better Fats

Eat the right types of fats to keep your body healthy and help keep your taste buds satisfied. Use these tips to help you make smart choices about choosing, using, and eating fats for good health.

Check the Label First

  • Read the Nutrition Facts label on packaged foods. Choose products that are lower in saturated fat, since these types of fat are less healthy.

Eat Foods with Healthy Fats

  • Eat nuts, seeds, and fatty fish like tuna, salmon, and sardines. These foods, as well as vegetable oils like olive and canola, are good sources of unsaturated fat – a healthier fat option.

Limit Saturated Fat

  • Build meals around protein foods that are naturally low in saturated fat such as beans, peas, and lentils, as well as soy foods, skinless chicken, seafood, and lean meats.

Skimp on “Solid Fats”

  • “Solid fats” such as butter, shortening, and fat from meats are high in unhealthy saturated fats. Switch to olive or canola oil for cooking and trim the fat when possible.

Swap the Spread

  • Switch from butter and cream cheese on your toast to a nut butter or a spread of avocado and a squeeze of lemon. These spreads contain healthier unsaturated fats.

Customize Your Order

  • Order baked or steamed options instead of fried foods, especially deep-fried. A dash of hot sauce or a spoonful of salsa adds flavor without adding fat.

For More Information: Click Here

Lesson 15 - New Ways to Enjoy Whole Grains

Work toward making at least half of your grain choices whole grains. Discover new ways to enjoy grains with these tips.

Have Whole Grains at Breakfast

  • Enjoy a whole grain hot cereal. Oatmeal is a favorite, but consider trying a grain that’s new to you, like buckwheat or millet. You might find a new breakfast favorite.

Enjoy a Multi-Grain Bowl

  • Create a one-dish meal by layering a mixture of grains like barley or wild rice with some colorful veggies and some low-fat cheese. Add your favorite protein and a dash of hot pepper sauce.

Swap your Sandwich Bread

  • Look for sandwich-type breads made with whole grains. Pita, tortillas, naan, sliced breads, and rolls are all available as whole grains.

Choose Whole Grain Takeout

  • Ask about whole grain options when dining out or ordering take-out food. For example, make a switch to whole-wheat pasta or brown or wild rice.

Experiment with a New Grain

  • Cook a new grain like quinoa, amaranth, or millet. You can find cooking tips and recipes online. Grains are pretty versatile and also have lots of important nutrients.

Switch up Pizza Night

  • Create individual, homemade pizzas on whole-wheat English muffins or tortillas. Or, make a traditional pizza using a pre-made whole-wheat flour. Don’t forget the veggie toppings.

For More Information: Click Here

Lesson 16 - Vary Your Protein Diet

Protein foods include seafood, lean meats, poultry, eggs, beans, peas, and lentils, nuts, seeds, and soy products. Use these tips to make a variety of protein food choices.

Include Protein in your Snack

  • Try peanut or nut butter as a dip for apple or celery slices, or as a spread on whole-grain crackers. A hard-cooked (hard-boiled) egg with a dash of pepper also makes a good protein snack.

Keep Seafood on Hand

  • Canned seafood, such as salmon, tuna, or crab is quick to prepare and enjoy. Canned items also store well.

Add Protein to your Salad

  • Grilled chicken or shrimp adds tasty protein to a salad of mixed greens. Chickpeas or black beans are delicious, budget-friendly options, too.

Take Protein on the Go

  • Pack a mixture of unsalted nuts and sunflower seeds for a crunchy snack. Add some dried fruit like raisins, cranberries, or chopped dates for a touch of sweetness.

Get Creative with Beans, Peas, and Lentils

  • Make chili or stews with kidney or pinto beans, have a bowl of split pea soup for lunch or dinner, or enjoy lentils as a side dish. Check online for recipe ideas.

Serve Up Lean Meat

  • Broil lean beef cuts like sirloin, top round, or flank steak. Sliced into strips, they’re great over greens, in a sandwich, or as is.

For More Information: Click Here